kriskexplorer
Needing a new wheel set and am down to either the Zipp Course 30 or the grail's.  I'm leaning toward the Zipp's.  Is there anything I'm missing or should also look at?

Wheel set needs:
- Disc brakes
- I weigh 195 so something durable
- Current bike is 9x100 QR front and 10x135 QR for the rear.  I’m looking at a new frame but it’s 15x100 TA in the front and 12x142 TA in the rear.
- Has Sram XD driver option.
- Price under 1k
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fleming
what about Crests?  Durability in spades.
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kriskexplorer
fleming wrote:
what about Crests?  Durability in spades.


I did but it looks like the rider weight is limited 190lbs and that's to low for me right now.
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FlashBazbo
Zipp's reputation on hubs isn't very good.  I would be hesitant to go with them.

How about American Classic Hurricane Discs?  They have 32 spokes and are seriously bomb-proof -- and are lighter than most. 
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kriskexplorer
FlashBazbo wrote:
Zipp's reputation on hubs isn't very good.  I would be hesitant to go with them.

How about American Classic Hurricane Discs?  They have 32 spokes and are seriously bomb-proof -- and are lighter than most. 


Thanks for the heads up on the zip hubs.  Just ordered the hurricane discs.  Looks like a great wheel.  Anyway they are on sale now at amclassicsales.com for $699 if anyone is looking.
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FlashBazbo
Enjoy the Hurricanes.  I've ridden them for over a year (7500 miles), including this year's DK200, and they've always performed.  They've been over very rocky trails and through lots of deeper-than-axle crossings.  Never any issues.  Never needed truing.  They still spin like new.   

With their aero rims, tubeless readiness and 32 spokes, it amazes me that these wheels are so light.  The rims grip onto a tire's bead and don't let go.
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kriskexplorer
Sweet. Which tires have you been running? I've been tubed but looking to go tubeless.
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FlashBazbo
I've been tubed -- mainly because I'm concerned about fixing a tubeless flat a long way from civilization.  Replacing a tube is too easy. 

My primary gravel tire has been the Challenge Gravel Grinder.  I've also ridden 28mm Conti 4 Seasons on them for the road. 
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kriskexplorer
I here ya on tubed.  There is a high probability I'll just stick to tubed myself.  I would like to give tubeless a try.  Those new Teravail cannonballs look sweet but pricey.
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kriskexplorer
IMG_9018.jpg 
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BluesDawg
FlashBazbo wrote:
I've been tubed -- mainly because I'm concerned about fixing a tubeless flat a long way from civilization.  Replacing a tube is too easy.  


Fixing a tubeless flat is either as simple as reinflating the tire with a CO2 cartridge to reseat the bead, or if that fails, removing the valve stem and installing a tube. What's the concern?
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FlashBazbo
BluesDawg wrote:
FlashBazbo wrote:
I've been tubed -- mainly because I'm concerned about fixing a tubeless flat a long way from civilization.  Replacing a tube is too easy.  


Fixing a tubeless flat is either as simple as reinflating the tire with a CO2 cartridge to reseat the bead, or if that fails, removing the valve stem and installing a tube. What's the concern?


As I said before -- it's still a lot easier to replace a tube.  No tools needed, ever.  A booted tubed tire is more likely to get you home than a slashed tubeless.  And . . . tubed tires aren't filled with goop. 


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BluesDawg
FlashBazbo wrote:
BluesDawg wrote:
FlashBazbo wrote:
I've been tubed -- mainly because I'm concerned about fixing a tubeless flat a long way from civilization.  Replacing a tube is too easy.  


Fixing a tubeless flat is either as simple as reinflating the tire with a CO2 cartridge to reseat the bead, or if that fails, removing the valve stem and installing a tube. What's the concern?


As I said before -- it's still a lot easier to replace a tube.  No tools needed, ever.  A booted tubed tire is more likely to get you home than a slashed tubeless.  And . . . tubed tires aren't filled with goop. 




I avoided tubeless setups for a long time due to the same concerns. My experiences since going tubeless a couple of years ago (Stan's tape and sealant with some tubeless ready tires and some not) has been the ability to run lower pressure and the resulting smoother ride and increased traction, far fewer flats and simple on-trail/road repairs.

I have had 3 flats while riding tubeless, all results of hard hits on rocks or ruts causing the tire to "burp" or push the bead away from the rim allowing air to escape. Twice I was able to reseal the tire with a shot of CO2 and continue on quickly. The third time I couldn't get a seal, so I had to remove the tire, pour out the sealant, remove the valve stem from the rim, remount the tire with a tube, reinflate and ride on. Same as for a tubed tire, but substituting removing the stem and pouring out sealant for removing the flat tube.

I have not slashed a tire myself, but I don't see how it would be different tubed or tubeless. Either way you boot it, install a tube and inflate.

That's my experience. YMMV


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