dmcg29
Much like everyone reading this, I need a new bike.  I can only justify this by taking advantage of a significant technology upgrade.  Alas, electronic shifting is my opportunity.  But, where are the gravel DI2 options????  Electronic shifting seems like the perfect match for a bike that will see dirty shifting cables/housings/etc.

Everyone who is anyone is pushing gravel/adventure bikes, but they all seem to stop short of electronic drivetrain options.  The Cervelo C3 is the only contender I'm aware of.  Building one up from components sounds like an expensive pain in the lower back.  What gives?  Am I missing something??
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TurboTom
I believe that this is mainly about pricing.  Di2 adds significantly to the list price.  Anywhere from $1000-$2000.  You can buy a whole, decent bike in that range.  The big manufacturers keep close track of sales and must figure they will sell more bikes this way.  They know that people will upgrade if cost is not an issue.  This also helps their dealers/bike shops make more money too.  Just like cars, margins are tight.

In addition, the electronic shifting options are changing rapidly with the introduction of wireless, which may be even more expensive on the top end.

High-end bikes are a small segment of any manufacturer's sales.

My road bike and gravel bikes both have Dura-Ace Di2.  That said, I would be equally happy with the performance and reliability of mechanical.

 
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DrSpoke
Specialized had a Diverge w/Di2, the 2015 Pro model, but dropped it for this year.  The 2016 Pro has Dura-Ace which I thought was kind of strange as it only comes w/a short cage RD along w/an 11-28 cassette.  So more of a road orientation.  That said, a friend of mine bought one and it's one of the best looking bikes I've ever seen.  He's since changed to an Ultegra GS RD and w/an 11-32 (and likely soon to an 11-36).

Last year when I was doing research on a new gravel bike I was looking hard at a Salsa Warbird Carbon.  I wanted to set it up w/Di2 and it turned out to be cheaper to buy a complete bike and convert it than to build one up from the frame.  It turned out that I couldn't get the Warbird so bought a Ridley X-Trail w/Shimano Ultegra instead.  Since then I've bought all the Di2 parts but haven't done the conversion as yet.  I got all the parts for < $1,000.  I think that if I were to sell the unused OEM parts that the net would be about $500 - $600.  Either way probably less expensive than buying it already installed.

I'm not familiar w/all the bikes out there but the Niner RLT, both steel and aluminum, is available OEM w/Ultegra Di2.  I've got the RLT steel and it's a very nice bike.  But have no plans to convert that one.
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DPCX
http://www.raleighusa.com/bikes-open-road-all-road-roker-ltd


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Nubster
http://www.ninerbikes.com/BSB9RDO
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BWV 211
I recently got my bike with DI 2 and notice that the lead to the rear derailleur is hanging out in a rather vulnerable position.  It looks like it could get snagged by brush if you're in close quarters.  Are there other solutions than just tying it down with zip ties?
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Tripintiger
I have a friend running Di2 1X11 with an 11-40T rear cassette. So, components are available. Sorry I don't know the particulars.
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dmcg29
Good call on the Roker LTD.  That appears to be the only stock Carbon, 40mm clearance, Di2 option going.  There are a shload of solid mechanical 105/Ultegra choices in the $2-3k range.  Why is it an extra $2k+ to go electronic?!  The upgrade kit can be had ~$1k.  Back out the mechanical parts you don't need and everyone should have a Di2 build at +$800 from their Ultegra.

I can only assume manufacturers think that anyone who wants Di2 wants a top end bike all-around (wheels, etc).  I think they're missing the boat on this one.  There must be a market larger than me that values the simplicity, ease-of-use, reduced maintenance, and 'new technology' factor of electronic and isn't too concerned with saving some grams here and there on the rest of the build.

I've had little luck finding a shop that will order the bike (Renegade-me!) and a Di2 kit and put them together.  Is that a realistic request?  Do manufacturers not want them doing that for some reason?  I could do it myself, but what a pain in the lower, lower back that would be.
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Nubster
With the new Shimano XT Di2 being announced...I bet there will be more CX/gravel bikes coming equipped with electronic shifting. I know that depending on price...I'm definitely interested when it becomes available. I'm really hoping though that SRAM comes out with a mid-cage r/d option for eTap to be able to run a 36T cassette or a mtb version that's not 1x12 only.
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Slim
I loved Dura-Ace Di2 when I rode it on test bikes when it first came out. I never realized how much physical and mental energy there was in shifting. Add to that the ability to shift in front under full power, and newer options (at least in SRAMand in mtb shimano) of shifting with just one up and one down lever, not worrying about dirt and mud in your cables and I agree, it seems like and awesome solution, as has been proven in CX.
Let's hope more bikes becomes available as more groups at different prices become available.

Any shop should be happy to order you a frame and build it up. Only issue would be the labor they'd want for it.
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