pawnee
I'm really tired of fixing flats, so I'll most likely be jumping into the realm of tubeless tires and rims sometime soon.

Does anyone have recommendations on tubeless rims (wheels) for a 40c tubeless tire? I'm not looking for anything fancy, just something affordable yet durable and long lasting, if there is such a thing.
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TrailMasonCliff
I'm not sure how helpful this will be but I come from the land of mountain biking and have been running tubeless with sealant for longer than I can remember. long before Stan's came out with his mass produced stuff.  

My most up to date method that has never failed me is to replace your rim strip with gorilla tape much stronger than Stan's strips add a universal tubeless valve set that you can pick up for $10 at your LBS. Take any tire add some Orange Seal (Best mass produced sealant in my opinion dose not give you the dreaded Stan's boogers) for the first time you may want to put in more than is recommended as the sealant will in effect upgrading your tire from one designed for tubes to a tubeless ready tire and you want some left over to do the normal sealant job of fixing punctures when they happen.

I have had this work on everything from high end wheels and tires all the way down to my daughters Walmart bike.

Good luck
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drwelby
I've heard good things about the WTB ChrisCross for being a strong, legit TCS rim at only $75 MSRP (and they have a brake track, since I assume this is for your Cross Check).

Those damn goatheads. I'm going tubeless too this year, just not 700c.
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pawnee
drwelby, Yes! Those dammed goatheads. I've gone through so many tubes, and I figure a tubeless setup will save me money (and frustration) in the long run. Though I'm hoping tubeless is all it's cracked up to be.

And yes, I've got the cantilever brakes, forgot to mention that. Those crisscross rims look promising, I'll have to investigate.



TrailMasonCliff, I was just looking into the "ghetto tubeless" setups, and I may end up going with something like that just to save money.
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drwelby
If you want cheap, sealant tubes can help a lot. You can buy them as-is or just get tubes with removable cores and pump the sealant in. You can use Slime from the hardware store or tubeless sealant or a mix. Or if you have a tubes with non-removable cores, when you get a hole in one, just make the hole a teeny bit bigger with a xacto knife, stretch the hole over the nozzle and pump it in. Then patch as usual*.

I got best results with Slime cut in half with latex moldbuilder. Some holes won't seal while the goathead thorn is still in there - I think there's some movement between the layers and the thorn shifts and keeps breaking the seal. Also, the big caveat (* above): you can't patch over a hole that is leaking slime, unless you clean all the slime off. Isopropyl alcohol wipes might work on the road, but you should carry another tube and not depend on a patch kit. This applies to tubeless too: if you get an unsealable hole and put in an emergency tube, that tube won't be patchable if you get another flat unless you are able to clean the area where the patch is supposed to adhere.

WTB has another rim, the Dual Duty 29", that would also work if you want something at the cheap/strong end of the spectrum. Tubeless compatible, brake tracks with wear indicators, 4mm wider and 160g more metal for a mere $45 MSRP.

Other rim options off the top of my head would be NoTubes Alpha 340, Velocity A23, Pacenti SL and PL series. These are all in the $100 range. If you want burly, there's the new Velocity Ciffhanger that's supposed to come out soon (there's an existing Cliffhanger but it's the Aeroheat profile and not tubeless). 

Are you coming out for the Weld County Waltz on Sunday?
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pawnee
Thanks for all the info! I better sit down mull this over. This will help a lot.

Yes, I'm coming down for the Weld County Waltz. Due to my current lack of cycling fitness I may cut the route a little short, but I'm excited none the less. Should be fun.

It would be good to meet you at some point.
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AlanEsh
What's the main reason you're getting flats, thorns or something? I try to run durable tires (Schwalbe, Conti hardcase, etc) and I get flats so rarely I don't even think about switching to tubeless/self-seal. Just curious!
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drwelby
Goathead thorns. I've run Schwalbes and they're heavy and leaden and the thorns get in around the side of the protective belt. 
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AlanEsh
Dang right they're heavy [biggrin]
Yeah we don't have thorns like that around here, thankfully.
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dgaddis1
There's quite a few good tubeless rims for dirt/cross use.  The hubs you use are a bigger driving factor than the rims though, as far as cost is concerned.

The WTB ChrissCross, as mentioned already, is a good choice.  The Pacenti SL23 is another good choice, and it comes in lots of drilling options (the WTB is 32H only), and the SL23 is also available in either a silver or black finish.
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TrailMasonCliff
Pawnee I highly recommend if you do chose to do the DIY tubeless You try the Gorilla method i described above the original Ghetto method with a cut in half undersized tube is not even close to as reliable and trouble free.

Good luck


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pawnee
I just ordered Stan's Tubeless Kit from Stan's No Tubes. I talked to a guy over the weekend and he highly recommended this setup... so I don't know, we'll see how it goes. I'll add a follow up to this topic after I get my first tubeless flat. [smile]
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dgaddis1
What rim are you using now Pawnee?

The conversion kits work okay, I had a 26" MTB set up that way, it was solid and reliable.

But, set up is a major PITA, you have to have a compressor.  With a real tubeless ready rim you can usually inflate with a floor pump, which is extra handy since I don't have a compressor haha.
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pawnee
dgaddis1,

I have 700c, Alex da16 rims. Cross(ish) rims?

The guy who recommended this kit has done it before, and he'll be helping me put it together.

I would prefer to have some tubeless rims, but the price is right for the kit, and frankly I'm ready to purchase something so I can get back on my bike asap, without flats. Hopefully the conversion option will work out.
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dgaddis1
The conversion option is great for what it is - an inexpensive way to try tubeless without committing to a new set of wheels.  Once you ride them for a while and decide if you like it, then you can look at new wheels later on down the road.  Proper rims just make set up 1,000 times easier, and will save some weight vs using the conversion kit.  But really, it's the easier set up that is so nice.  Especially when it's 10pm the night before a ride and you need to swap tires haha.
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Croz
I'll second what Dustin said above.

I just built up a set of wheels with Pacenti SL25 tubeless rims. I threw on some tubeless road tires (Schwalbe The One) and they just aired right up. I headed out for the first ride on those wheels10 min after pressing the first tire onto the rim. I was expecting 30 minutes of fiddling... It just worked. I've also got some Velocity Aileron rims that I use for gravel riding and they are nice to try different tires (tubeless and non-tubeless) on.

I've run tubeless mtb for years and started with a split tube, then various tapes... A tubeless rim really is much easier.

Steve




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