Fishman
I recently purchased a Cannondale Topstone. The stock bike comes with WTB Nano's on WTB rims. Out of the box the wheels are set up with tubes but both tire and rim are tubeless ready.

I am working on upgrading the wheels. I would like to use the Nano's but have run into a problem trying to remove them from the stock wheels. The tire bead is super tight. I can barely separate the bead from the rim, let alone, work a tire lever into the tiny gap created. 

Any tips on how to remove the tire? 

Grateful I did not discover this after flatting late in the day and miles from home.
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chas
Welcome to the new world of tubeless headaches.  I love tubeless (but sometimes I hate it).

you HAVE to get the bead in that center channel on the opposite side of your lever to get the bead off.  

And to put it back on, you'll really appreciate the $13 spent on this:  
https://www.amazon.com/Kool-Stop-Tire-Bead-Jack/dp/B001AYML7K/
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Fishman
Thanks for the tip.

Working the beads into the center channel did the trick. After that the tire came off relatively easily.

The difficult part was separating the bead from the track in the rim that holds it in. I used a flat head screw driver to gingerly get a gap started. Once I had the gap no tools were needed to work around the rim separating the rest of the bead. With one second side done the second side was no problem. 

I was able to set up the Nano tire on the other rim (tubeless) with out issue.     
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SWGraveler
Thanks for the link to that tool; I read a few review and ordered one immediately. I have small hands and struggle with most tires so I am really looking forward to having this tool! 
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chas
Glad to help!
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bnystrom
Fishman wrote:
Thanks for the tip.
I used a flat head screw driver to gingerly get a gap started.

You should never use a screwdriver on tires, especially tubeless. That's the quickest way to damage the bead and compromise the seal. I have yet to see a tubeless gravel tire that couldn't be pushed off the bead seat by hand. Worst case, after you have let all of the air out, support the rim on a block of wood or something similar so you can use your thumbs and body weight to push the tire off the bead seat.

In the unlikely event that you absolutely must use a tool to unseat the tire, use a tire iron, preferably a plastic one, to avoid damaging the rim or tire.

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Working the beads into the center channel did the trick. After that the tire came off relatively easily.

This is "tire changing 101" and it's standard practice for ALL types of tires. I suggest that you check online for basic tire changing instructions as there are plenty of videos of the process. Once you understand the principles, most tire changing is easy, though there are some tubeless combinations that don't work well, or at all.

The Tire Bead Jack is a useful tool, but it's not a substitute for proper tire changing technique. If you neglect to make sure the that tire is completely in the center channel, you can end up damaging the bead by using the Tire Bead Jack. It's really a last-resort tool for difficult tire/rim combinations, not something you grab for every tire changing job.

When it comes to re-seating the tire, applying slightly soapy water to the tire beads and bead seats on the rims really helps them seat and seal properly.
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dangle
bnystrom is absolutely correct on each point.

Once thing that isn't mentioned much is that you can break a rim with a bead jack as well. I think bead jacks are awesome in the right application, but if you get a tubeless tire (bead) that's bulletproof and try to stretch it onto a wheel where you don't have the tire in the center channel, the wheel will give before the bead in some cases. I have personally seen one 4 figure name-brand wheel that cracked when somebody used a bead jack to muscle a popular tubeless tire onto it. Wasn't covered under warranty.
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bnystrom
That's a great point. The bead jack has a very small contact area with the rim, which creates a high stress point when you use it. It could easily dent an alloy rim and I wouldn't even consider using it on an expensive carbon rim.
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dangle
I mean, any tool used improperly can cause damage. I use the heck out of a bead jack. There's not a great reason not to use them (or risk of wheel damage) unless the tire is on there wrong or it's simply not a compatible combination.

I'm trying to say (to others) that a bead jack can be useful for getting that last bit of tire up and over, but don't bother with it if you're nowhere close.
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bnystrom
dangle wrote:
I'm trying to say (to others) that a bead jack can be useful for getting that last bit of tire up and over, but don't bother with it if you're nowhere close.

Agreed.
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Koyote
I’m always surprised at how few cyclists understand the technique for getting a tire bead over a rim with just the bare hands. 
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bnystrom
Yeah, it's pretty appalling, but the problem is that it's information that riders will not learn unless they seek it out. It would be great if bikes came with basic maintenance classes, but they don't and it's not likely to happen.

Sadly, we now live in an age where to most people, "self-sufficiency" means carrying a cell phone so you can call for help.
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Koyote
I did a quick look online for a video which demonstrates the technique… But did not find a short one that was appropriate. But, I will bet that any shop mechanic will happily show a customer how to mount a tire with a tight bead. Once a mechanic demonstrates it, it is pretty easy to understand. That’s how I learned!
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bnystrom
I was a shop mechanic, so that's how I learned.  😉
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smoothmoose
I had the same problem with WTB rim and tire combo.  Instead of using a screwdriver, I used a rolled up tube and wedged between my palm and the tire to unseat.  This gives more leverage to pull the tire off the bead rather than trying to squeeze a deflated tire between your palms and your fingers.
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