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bnystrom
Miche makes a 12-32, 11-speed cassette, which is what I'm using. It's not quite the same quality as Shimano/SRAM cassettes (part# CALP1BS1232), but it shifts fine and it's ~$70. I ordered two from a shop in the UK (no one in the US had them), but I don't recall who it was. If you search for the part number, you should be able to find a few sources.
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Angstrom
For Shimano cassettes, it’s easy to swap the 11t threaded lock ring for a 12.  I did that because I wanted a gear I’d use more often.  
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bnystrom
I'm not sure what you mean by "11t threaded lock ring", but I have tried removing the 11-tooth cog and inserting another cog in the cassette (16-tooth IIRC). The problem with Shimano cassettes is that it's really difficult to find a single cog that aligns properly with the rest (if one even exists). In my case the experiment was a failure because it didn't shift reliably onto the new cog, which was really aggravating. That's why I ultimately went with the Miche cassettes. They offer a stock cassette with the gearing I wanted, but you can also create custom gearing if you want to; it's just a matter of finding a Miche dealer who stocks their cogs and bodies.

There are two minor caveats with Miche cassettes:

- The cogs fit quite snug on the freehub body. At first, I didn't think they would fit, but they do. This tight fit is probably beneficial, as it means the cogs have more contact area with the freehub splines.

- When you have all of the cogs and spacers all installed, it may appear that the cassette is too thick and the outermost cog may just barely engage the splines. When you initially install the lockring, it may be necessary to hold the outer cog in alignment as you start tightening. Once the stack compresses, it all fits nicely and aligns perfectly.
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zen_
bnystrom wrote:
My gripe with both companies is their ridiculous fixation on maintaining the high end of the gearing range, when it's a pretty safe bet that the majority of their customers rarely use it. Not offering alternatives for us "mere mortals" is really stupid and shortsighted. I'm 63 and reasonably fit, and 46/30 chainrings with a 12-32 cassette gets the job done, for me. I have no use for an 11-tooth cog, let alone a 10. I can hit 35 mph with the top gear I have, but that's only going to happen downhill, when I'm most likely to be coasting and conserving energy. I'll inevitably have to go lower on the low end as I get older, but I'm never going to need more on the high end. SRAM and Shimano just don't get it.


You might try the 105 11-34 cassette if you're running 11 speed. I was put off by it for a long time because I don't need the 34t, but it's spaced 11-13-15-17-19-21-23-25-27-30-34t instead of the usual 1t jumps at the bottom. Sure this makes for some big jumps on the smallest 3 cogs, but as with you, I really only use the 2 smallest cogs for peddling on fast downhills, or with huge tailwinds, both of which are not terribly cadence sensitive.

I also changed my mind somewhat on having the 34t as a true bailout gear after finding some grades over 15%, or being stuck on steep climbs with very loose gravel where climbing out of the saddle can be problematic for efficiency.
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Angstrom

Sorry — I had a brain cramp.  The 12t cog is not threaded:
https://www.worldwidecyclery.com/products/shimano-ultegra-6800-11-speed-12t-1st-position-cassette-cog
It is a direct replacement for the 11t.

I also made a 12-32 by mating the small cogs of a 12-25 and the large cogs of the 11-32.

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