RadDogRoadWarrior

This applies to gravel and road, although technically I was going for a road ride.

Me: "Going for a training ride sweetie."

Wife/son: "But it is raining."

Me (confused): "What is your point?"

 

It's 92 degrees out, I am going to be soaking wet regardless. I can't even believe I had this conversation.

Can I tell my son to harden up?

 

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Alex_C
As long as there isn't any lightning, rain is good for hard efforts!
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RadDogRoadWarrior
Rain stopped half way into the ride, it was perfect!
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shiggy
“It’s 8F and snowing,”
”Perfect. See you in 5 hours.”
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Zurichman
That's a big no for me shiggy. Hate to admit this but at age 69 I can no longer take the cold on the bike. Snowshoeing and skiing yes, biking a big no.
Zman 
If it was easy it wouldn't be a memory. You just hope you don't have all your memories in the same ride. been there dun that Zman
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Mudge

Can I tell my son to harden up?



No, unless you want him to hate you. Just keep setting an example. 

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Zurichman
I only wish my son's when they were younger rode with me. We went skiing together a few times and that was it. Consider yourself a lucky man.

Zman
If it was easy it wouldn't be a memory. You just hope you don't have all your memories in the same ride. been there dun that Zman
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RadDogRoadWarrior
Mudge wrote:


No, unless you want him to hate you. Just keep setting an example. 

 



I probably should not have threatened to sell him to the Circus.
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Angstrom
I'm not training for anything specific.  I prefer not to ride in the rain.  There are plenty of other things I can do to improve my riding that don't involve grit and road slime and soggy shorts.

I've ridden enough muddy events to say no, I really don't enjoy it.  I can choose my own Type II fun.  Mud isn't it.

Chance of showers?  Sure.  Clip-on fender, jacket in back pocket, deal with it as it comes.  If the rain's already coming down in buckets, the bike's staying in the garage.
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baron
I think the only old school mentality I'm seeing is telling someone to harden up. "Back in the day," we'd practice football on days so cold, the sweet would trickle down from your helmet and freeze on your eyebrows or so muddy that the coach would be standing by with a hose to spray you off, pads and all. Water was a privilege to be earned when you worked so hard you puked. The good, old hard days. If you are training for something specific, explain it to the family well ahead of time so that they know. As someone with 3 young children, I know the "but it's raining" is their way of saying "you've ridden 4 times this week already, can you please just hang out with us right now?" and most of the time I will. I can always ride late night when they are sleeping or early in the morning before anyone is up. I'm sure what you said is mostly tongue in cheek, but a lot of my friends are still stuck in the "harden up" days of yore, so it's hard to tell anymore. 
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Angstrom
Yeah, the aggressive "HTFU" attitude gets old fast.  

I've been cold, wet, exhausted and kept going. I've done difficult and dangerous work.  But I ride bikes because I like to, where and when I want to, and how hard I want to push myself is nobody's business but mine. 

Someone who's new to cycling or new to endurance sports may not realize how hard they can push themselves.  It can take a while to learn how to do that, and to appreciate the rewards.  Just telling them to "harden up" probably won't do it.

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RobF

Does "old school" mean riding in the rain, or the dark, or anything else intimidating can be fun once you try it? I'll drag people along with me whenever possible if I'm confident they'll enjoy it once they get started

Does "old school" mean you aren't a real rider unless you make yourself cold, broken, or otherwise miserable intentionally? No thanks. I'll do that to myself (hello Mid-South & DK), but I'd never tell someone they had to HTFU if they weren't driven to. That's a good way to have cyclists, and fewer friends.

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RadDogRoadWarrior

"Does "old school" mean you aren't a real rider unless you make yourself cold, broken, or otherwise miserable intentionally? No thanks."

 

Old school means cold, broken and perfectly happy. For a bike messenger it is just another day on the best job ever.

 

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RadDogRoadWarrior
It should be noted that my 12 year old son has sworn to place me in an old folk's home at the first opportunity.
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SteeleWheels
This thread caught my interest. I'm a recreational rider these days but when I was younger and "training" I would purposefully ride in the worst conditions. I would wait until the hottest part of the day and go out during a downpour or heavy wind. Now, I choose the best days but I don't mind rain. The one thing that really bothers me though is this "no riding on wet trails" BS. The train of thought used to be that when the roads were wet or it was raining you would grab your mountain bike and hit the trails. Now you're not suppose to ride trails when they are wet. How stupid. California IMBA ruined mountain biking trails.I live in Virginia and they are wet most of the year and I ride them.Some trails in NOVA actually have gates closed at the access when they are deemed "too wet". Totally stupid. What are you going to do, write me a ticket?

Not weather related but skidding is the same thing. It used to be frowned upon. For one thing it erodes the trails. Now everyone is skidding through the corners and tearing the trail up. At least they're not riding when the trails are wet!  I say ride when you want, in any weather conditions. Riding is about freedom.
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Zurichman
This thread caught my interest. I'm a recreational rider these days but when I was younger and "training" I would purposefully ride in the worst conditions. I would wait until the hottest part of the day and go out during a downpour or heavy wind. Now, I choose the best days but I don't mind rain. The one thing that really bothers me though is this "no riding on wet trails" BS. The train of thought used to be that when the roads were wet or it was raining you would grab your mountain bike and hit the trails. Now you're not suppose to ride trails when they are wet. How stupid. California IMBA ruined mountain biking trails.I live in Virginia and they are wet most of the year and I ride them.Some trails in NOVA actually have gates closed at the access when they are deemed "too wet". Totally stupid. What are you going to do, write me a ticket?

Not weather related but skidding is the same thing. It used to be frowned upon. For one thing it erodes the trails. Now everyone is skidding through the corners and tearing the trail up. At least they're not riding when the trails are wet!  I say ride when you want, in any weather conditions. Riding is about freedom.


SteeleWheels there are a lot of folks out there that do trail maintenance. Most trails when you ride them wet caused ruts in the trails. I don't ride trails like that but if I did I wouldn't ride them wet since I don't do trail maintenance. I see a few mt. bike trail facebook sites where the members posted which trails were ride able and which ones weren't.

Zman
If it was easy it wouldn't be a memory. You just hope you don't have all your memories in the same ride. been there dun that Zman
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RadDogRoadWarrior

To be honest, I have not followed bicycle racing (more MMA and other martial arts and some football) but I used to follow. Coming from a wrestling background I was always impressed with the toughness and the mind set of racers. Guys were called things like "The Cannibal" and having ridden with some guys who were legit, those guys hammered hard. Greg Lemond taking steroids did not bother me one bit, LOL. I don't know much about modern racers.

I am also a competitive bodybuilder. I can tell you that gyms have become home to the most pussyfied estrogen repositories imaginable, but I do not know if this has spread to the bike world. Young men today are increasingly effeminate.

I might be weird, but when I go out to ride, my goal is to ride as fast and push myself as hard as possible. I am learning not to always do that, to slow down and enjoy things a bit more but old habits....

Today I was out and, at the age of 58 I had a moment where I thought "holy shit, I don't know if I have enough in me to make it home" LOL. That is how I know it was a good ride.

 

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RadDogRoadWarrior

Here is the thing when it come to weather. A 30 minute bike ride at 80 plus % of my Vo2 Max is an integral component of my overall training. I am training for an IFBB pro card in Masters Bodybuilding (60 and over...I was a runner up in the 50 and over). I do as much a 10 hours of cardio per week before a contest. I am too old to run.

These 3 sessions are written in stone (they will eventually become 1 full hour sessions as I need to get leaner). That means they are 100% mandatory. The worst here in South Texas is 96 degree heat with brutal humidity. But the training must be done. I actually prefer rain to really high heat.

I have learned to ignore weather. The last few days when I got out I was pleasantly surprised. It was in the 80's with low humidity.

 

 

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mosinglespeeder
what an interesting question:  the old school mentality and the weather

I personally have always had the attitude that I need to harden up.  Its simply in my genome, it started when I was a kid, taking the initiative to play baseball, to face the best...hardest throwing...fastest pitcher in little league and it garnered success, which then followed me into football, which followed me into academics which followed me into my profession.  Had I not just sucked it up, I would likely have given up in some way and fashion. 

Having blown an ACL 30 years ago, the ortho doc said to try cycling and my love has followed me since.  It was a great fit, I could always find a road or a group that hardened me up.  I was at one point riding with the fast group and A groups and did well as an amateur.  There were days of snow, that everyone else was at home, I was riding, days I was hailed on and sadly made the bad decision to try to beat the storm and lost, lightening around me and all.  There have been rides I have found the barn and an awning to hang til the storms passed, and when I got home, the wife asks if I am just mental or what....and probably a good question.

30 years later, I am pretty laid back now, not near my race weight, nor do I care. I am a grandpa now, and love it, and miss more rides now than I care to admit.  So, is it harden up, or ride smarter now???  I prefer the latter and picking my times out that I don't have to worry about my A bike or B bike, the hour of post ride cleaning and all the like.

Listen, my point really is this, if your worried about riding in rain, then you better not.  If worried about lightening...you better not.  Its snowing....and your hesitant then don't.  I get remarks about riding in traffic, I feel fine with it, but if others don't.. then don't.   Cycling isn't about living regretfully, its about living fulfillingly, and that is where I find myself now.

no regrets....keep the rubber side down
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RadDogRoadWarrior
That ^ is a beautiful post!
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