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bobknh
bobknh wrote:

Thanks for the suggestion. My 30 year old copy of Jobst Brandt's "The Bicycle Wheel" is hiding somewhere in garage: https://smile.amazon.com/Bicycle-Wheel-3rd-Jobst-Brandt/dp/0960723668/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1467116670&sr=1-1&keywords=jobst+brandt -- and this looks like a great update for modern components.

Also purchased the Musson book online. In truth, I'll probably never build my own wheels -- life is too short. But, this is a great book for any serious cyclist to read. Musson does a great job in de-mystifing wheel tech and engineering. 
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benmills
bobknh wrote:

Also purchased the Musson book online. In truth, I'll probably never build my own wheels -- life is too short. But, this is a great book for any serious cyclist to read. Musson does a great job in de-mystifing wheel tech and engineering. 


I'd say life is too short NOT to build your own wheels ;-)  It's really rewarding when you are done, though I have to say that the initial expense (decent truing stand, tensiometer, dishing tool, etc, etc) is a tough pill to swallow.
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cyclecuse
shiggy wrote:
Wheel building rule #1: Never order spokes before you have the rims and hubs in hand. Rule #2: Never trust anyone else's measurements for rims and hubs, or spoke calculations.


Just wanted to highlight this as superb advice. The specs on manufacturer websites are riddled with errors. Some smaller hub manufacturers publish dimensioned drawings which I use as a check to make sure my own measurements aren't wildly off, but that's it.
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bobknh
benmills wrote:


I'd say life is too short NOT to build your own wheels ;-)  It's really rewarding when you are done, though I have to say that the initial expense (decent truing stand, tensiometer, dishing tool, etc, etc) is a tough pill to swallow.

You are correct. But, then again, so am I. Most be a Zen Koan.
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