JWB475
I have properly bed in brake pads a number of times, it's a pretty simple process and you can tell when they really start grab. 

But I got a kick out of the owners manual instructions for a set of Magura brakes I just installed on my fat bike. 

It says I should accelerate the bicycle to 20 mph, brake suddenly to a stop, and repeat 30 to 50 times.

Assuming I can even get my fat bike up to 20mph, repeat 30 to 50 times? 

If I followed those instructions I would probably need new brake pads by the time I am done.  It would also be one hell of a workout.
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Slim
I would hope you wouldn’t need new pads after that braking thirty times, but indeed, pretty hard effort, haha!

That’s why I bed my brakes in on a good downhill, makes it a lot easier to get up to speed, al thoug I usually settle for 18mph, ;-)
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bnystrom

The instructions I've seen have always said not to brake to a complete stop, just brake hard to a low speed, then repeat a dozen or so times. It's more about generating heat in your brakes to transfer pad material to the rotors than about the speed you use to get there. I don't get too worked up over the process, as I haven't found that much of a difference in braking afterward and the pads will bed in from use, anyway. Also, the first time your brakes get wet, you'll have to do it all over again.

I think Magura's instructions are more appropriate for a downhill MTB than a gravel bike.

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davist
I don't think it's a big issue with resin pads. (all I've used) I've heard/read that with the metal pads you have to break in properly otherwise they'll squeal forever (exaggerating)
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chas
Agreed, do not brake to a stop when breaking in...
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Slim

chas wrote:
Agreed, do not brake to a stop when breaking in...


Yep, because you don’t want to put material or wear on only one spot of the rotor.

And that’s another reason to do it on a downhill, far easier to keep moving(very slowly), but not stopping.

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