daustin
I've only recently started to run tubeless.  I've seen mention on some posts about tubeless is great unless you run into problems. not initial install but I problems out on a ride I guess. But I've only seen vague references.  I'm not seeing descriptions what the actual issues are.  am I missing some deep dark secret to the cons of running tubeless?
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smoothmoose
Nah.  The only issues I've run into is setup.  It's more from user error and/or experience.  The more tires/wheels I change, the better I get at it.  My main suggestion here is don't go ghetto and use proper rim tape and values and all the other tools that make the process easier.

The only "issue" on an on-going basis is the more frequent air top-ups.  In my case I do it weekly on both my gravel and MTB.  Can get away with every 2 weeks, if you're not too picky about tire pressure.

The issue that some people run into is just running the wrong sealant for the purpose or climate.  Normal Stan's NoTube is defacto standard that seems to work good in a variety of situations.
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Zurichman
Something to remember when you are running tubeless and this has happened to me already. I have 2 gravel bikes. A Raleigh Roker which is my go to race bike and a Raleigh Tamland 1 which I call my beater bike. I don't ride my beater bike very often. Last spring I took it out for a spin. I then put it in the basement. When I went to ride it again it had a flat tire. It only had a small thorn in it. Because the bike sat for such a  long time the sealant had all dried up in one spot. If your bike is going to set for awhile you need to rotate the tires to prevent this. I see a normal recommendation of adding sealant every 6 months but I guess that depends in what type of climate you live in or what sealant you are using. Just a FYI. Love riding tubeless even though it took me awhile to get use to running a 1/2 flat tire.

Zman
If it was easy it wouldn't be a memory. You just hope you don't have all your memories in the same ride. been there dun that Zman
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daustin
Zurichman wrote:
Something to remember when you are running tubeless and this has happened to me already. I have 2 gravel bikes. A Raleigh Roker which is my go to race bike and a Raleigh Tamland 1 which I call my beater bike. I don't ride my beater bike very often. Last spring I took it out for a spin. I then put it in the basement. When I went to ride it again it had a flat tire. It only had a small thorn in it. Because the bike sat for such a  long time the sealant had all dried up in one spot. If your bike is going to set for awhile you need to rotate the tires to prevent this. I see a normal recommendation of adding sealant every 6 months but I guess that depends in what type of climate you live in or what sealant you are using. Just a FYI. Love riding tubeless even though it took me awhile to get use to running a 1/2 flat tire.

Zman


thanks for the tip. Funny my other gravel bike is a 2017 raleigh Tamland 1. Not a bad bike. I just found it to be very heavy and not the most nimble bike. I always described it as a tank. It was fine once you got it up to speed and going in one direction but outside of that you often felt the full weight of that bike. 
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shiggy
Only issues I have had is not adding sealant soon enough. When the sealant dries out there is nothing left to fix punctures. So once the tires need to be pumped up more often and/or the pressure is dropping more quickly, add sealant.

oh! And I have had rim tape shift, with sealant will not fix
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