brady

I posted this on another forum but though some more gravel specific folks might have some advice...


There are several options, but I'm not sure if I've settled on the best option yet.

Carrying bottles only has a few drawbacks; not enough for long events and I have to slow slightly to grab the bottle, robbing momentum.

Using a Camelbak or other type of system works fine but I get really hot with that weight on my back.  I tried using my Osprey daypack that sits off my back.  It was slightly better, but weighs a little more and moved around more whenever I stood up.

Has anyone used a frame bag to carry a water bladder?  My frame is pretty small so I would basically be better off getting a full frame bag since I can't get a bag such as the Revelate Tangle Bag to work for me.  The small would probably fit the bike, but I can't get my bladder in it, the medium would fit the bladder, but not my bike.

I was just wondering how a water bladder on the bike frame affected it's handling.  Or any other insights anyone can offer would be appreciated.

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henrypretz
Hi Brady - 
I have a GT Grade 53cm and use a Tangle bag.  A friend cnc'd an adapter plate to lower the seat tube bottle cage (Lezyne side loaders)  I have used my Camelback bladder (70 oz, I think) in the Tangle, and also stuffed two 20 oz bottles in the holders.  It's difficult to access the bottles on the move, but the bag actually keeps them in place when the going gets really bumpy.
As far as handling goes, the weight is definitely noticeable, but the rig is no lightweight anyway. 
I get the impression that you are riding at a decidedly faster rate of speed than I am, so this might not be acceptable to you.
You could also stuff two full bottles in the Tangle (instead of a bladder) and two in your holders.  That's 80+oz but you would need to swap the empty with the full at some point.  Also might see if the Feed Bags are something that you could live with.
Just throwing some random thoughts out there .....

Cheers!
Henry


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CBBaron
One advantage to being tall I guess. 
With a 60cm frame I can fit 2 Zefal Magnum (32oz) water bottles inside the frame triangle and a 3rd under the down tube if I need to carry more water. And there is even room to add a medium tangle bag [smile]
I prefer using bottles because I mix sports drinks and bottles are much easier to get clean afterwards.
I think a custom frame bag with bladder would work pretty well. I would get one of those ID lanyards with the retractable leash and rig that up to keep your drinking hose contained when not in use. 

Craig
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brady
That's a good idea with the lanyard thing.  I may have to try something like that if the frame bag plan works.  Otherwise, I'll just deal with my current set up.
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RoverAl
check this out, it was mentioned in a thread here  awhile back

category/veleau https://www.showerspass.com/product-category/veleau
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FlashBazbo
I was curious about the same thing and it seemed to me that my Tangle bag with a bladder might be the way to go.  Then, when I was researching the setup, I came across a blog (I forget which one) where a half dozen people were discussing their experiences using a bladder in a frame bag. 

The downside was something I hadn't anticipated -- with the bladder flat, there's no extra pressure to "help" the liquid through the hose.  And with the bladder so low, you've got to suck the liquid up the entire length of the hose (rather than less than 1/2 the length when it's on your back).  To a person, they found this fairly difficult to do when riding.  Didn't sound good.

I like the idea of placing water bottles in the frame bag.  Sounds like a decent idea.  I will have to go now and check them for fit. 
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xhx
FlashBazbo wrote:
I was curious about the same thing and it seemed to me that my Tangle bag with a bladder might be the way to go.  Then, when I was researching the setup, I came across a blog (I forget which one) where a half dozen people were discussing their experiences using a bladder in a frame bag. 

The downside was something I hadn't anticipated -- with the bladder flat, there's no extra pressure to "help" the liquid through the hose.  And with the bladder so low, you've got to suck the liquid up the entire length of the hose (rather than less than 1/2 the length when it's on your back).  To a person, they found this fairly difficult to do when riding.  Didn't sound good.


From my experience it depends on how I orient the bladder in the bag.  I'm using a 3L Camelbak bladder in a Revelate tangle bag and the standard hose that comes with the bladder.  I try to orient the bladder so the hose is as low as possible with the quick disconnect at the back of the tangle bag.  I do notice the last maybe quarter liter gets hard to draw through the hose, but not impossible.  If temps are above freezing I don't let the water drain from the tube after I drink - that helps with the delay and difficulty sucking up the water.  Below freezing I'll blow the liquid back through the hose to prevent freezing and deal with the extra few pulls it takes to get water [smile]
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Slim
I have also used a bladder in frame bag. If you mount it right below your toptube and drink in a low, aero, positition, it's not any worse than drinking while standing upright with a backpack.
The other option I have used, especially for events with resupplies, where the bladder isn't necessary, is a collapsible bottle in a jersey pocket.
Then there are the triathlon double bottle cages behind the seat post, or on the the handlebars. Between al that, you should be able to carry enough water for a one day ride.
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JSinLR
I like how this guy set up his bike for DK200: http://www.bikeradar.com/us/road/gear/article/horse-for-the-course-specialized-crux-for-the-dirty-kanza-200-47623/

The ponytail holder is a neat trick. No set up is perfect for all rides or races but that's the fun part, experiementing til you find what works for you.
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dangle
JSinLR wrote:
I like how this guy set up his bike for DK200: http://www.bikeradar.com/us/road/gear/article/horse-for-the-course-specialized-crux-for-the-dirty-kanza-200-47623/ The ponytail holder is a neat trick. No set up is perfect for all rides or races but that's the fun part, experiementing til you find what works for you.


The hair tie/ponytail holder is an absolute must as well. Those bottles will be gone after the first few bumps for that style of carrier. I lost a bottle on pavement with one of those ridiculous X Lab Gorilla cages, but some rubber bands (or large rubber rings like what's used on a Garmin mount) work really well. I can fit all of my spares/tools in one 24oz water bottle (tennis ball cans work well too) and not worry about 'losing' the space for a saddle bag. Or doing the same trick with an under-the-downtube mount and not caring if it gets dirty since you're not putting it in your mouth.

I can't stand Camelbacks off the mountain bike and farting around with bladders and frame bags takes more money and time than I'm okay with, so I have really enjoyed the triathlon style bottle holders and 'launched' enough bottles to figure out what works for me.
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