spectastic
my road tires get about 3-4k miles (?) before they start to develop a significant flat spot. gravel tires have a much larger contact area, and should in theory last a lot longer. anyone wear out a gravel tire? which tire was it, how many miles did it take?

I got tervail cannonballs.
as of 3/24/19, I vow to not argue with idiots on the internet
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waxthis
Depends how how much "pavement" you have to ride before you hit the Gravel. Riddler 37mm lasted 400Mi, Rambler 40mm 800Mi, Donnelly MSO 40mm 1200 mi "All rear tire wear". Currently running Donnelly Strada USH 40mm, by the looks of it they should make 2k..40/60gravel.  Front tires on all have many more miles left..Just my two cents worth..Happy Hunting..Oh, and cheapest I've found for tires... https://www.biketiresdirect.com/

 
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spectastic
waxthis wrote:
Depends how how much "pavement" you have to ride before you hit the Gravel. Riddler 37mm lasted 400Mi, Rambler 40mm 800Mi, Donnelly MSO 40mm 1200 mi "All rear tire wear". Currently running Donnelly Strada USH 40mm, by the looks of it they should make 2k..40/60gravel.  Front tires on all have many more miles left..Just my two cents worth..Happy Hunting..Oh, and cheapest I've found for tires... https://www.biketiresdirect.com/

 


is pavement supposed to put more wear on the tires?

those are awfully low miles. how do you decide when a tire is 'done'?
as of 3/24/19, I vow to not argue with idiots on the internet
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waxthis
Pavement does eat up the tire more because of the knobs etc....  Now where I live most of our roads are used by oil tankers so we have ruts, and small rocks so tires tend to wear faster "rear tire", for me anyhow.  Now go south/west of here were the roads are smooth dirt, I'm sure I could double the life of them.  It's really based on your riding area and habits.  I have a buddy with those tervail cannonballs and he has close to 2500 on them, and he rides the same area's as me.  So again, results will vary...Again, all the wear is on the rear, my front tires could double that milage.   I also swap my tires out with about 15-20 percent tread left, I could probably ride a few hundred miles further, but I don't want to risk a flat 60 miles from home.  Just my preference.

Rear 1200 Miles..Donnelly MSO 40mm Tubeless. IMG_6679.jpg 

Front 1200 miles...
IMG_6681.jpg
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bnystrom
You're not going to find any consensus on this question because there are so many variables. Your tires will last as long as they last; just ride and don't worry about it. Keep a spare tire at home in case you trash one or wear one out.
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spectastic
waxthis wrote:
Pavement does eat up the tire more because of the knobs etc....  Now where I live most of our roads are used by oil tankers so we have ruts, and small rocks so tires tend to wear faster "rear tire", for me anyhow.  Now go south/west of here were the roads are smooth dirt, I'm sure I could double the life of them.  It's really based on your riding area and habits.  I have a buddy with those tervail cannonballs and he has close to 2500 on them, and he rides the same area's as me.  So again, results will vary...Again, all the wear is on the rear, my front tires could double that milage.   I also swap my tires out with about 15-20 percent tread left, I could probably ride a few hundred miles further, but I don't want to risk a flat 60 miles from home.  Just my preference.

Rear 1200 Miles..Donnelly MSO 40mm Tubeless. IMG_6679.jpg 

Front 1200 miles...
IMG_6681.jpg


i'm guessing that replacing the tire has more to do with puncture protection? does the bald surface make a noticeable difference in traction and rolling resistance?
as of 3/24/19, I vow to not argue with idiots on the internet
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chas

I do find that knobbies wear pretty fast on the road.  I’ve gotten some MTB tires to wear out after a couple hundred miles of hard use.

Its hard to say how much time I spend on treaded gravel tires vs slicks, but the knobs do get kinda smooth.   Maybe they wear 3-4 times faster than an endurance “race” tire?

 

I tell myself that a worn center has less rolling resistance, and thus is a good thing.  I’m not sure the size of your knob is directly related to puncture resistance, but to some degree the inherent distortion in a knob is inefficient.  If I can hear the rumble of the tire on pavement, I figure that sound is representative of a loss of energy. 

As far as traction, I’m mostly concerned about cornering and breakaway characteristics, and the smooth center tread doesn’t impact that much.  Does hurt in my ability to climb a steep muddy hill though I guess.

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Craptacular8
I was able to get 1100 out of a rear on a 700x38 Challenge Gravel Grinder race.  I probably rode 60% road, rest on gravel.  I think it wore faster because the rubber was a softer compound, might be true for other gravel specific tires as well.  I've been running Compass Bon Jon's standard casing since then.  Have another 1200 miles on them, and they show no signs of wear at all, same kind of riding, as I use my gravel bike for loaded touring as well.
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