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ccand51997
Cmtgravel wrote:
I admit.i'm a bit of.a curmudgeon when it comes to this issue, as i've never seen the need for going tubeless personaaly. I have a little experience with latex tubes, and i'm not a fan. Given your stated intended use, the benefit of switching to tubeless, with all its added headaches, seems minimal.

If you never get flats, if you are not really worried about speed and if your roads are smooth then tubeless would not be of much benefit.  I've been working out of town for five weeks in the Oceanside, Ca, area and they have a million smooth roads and great climbing hills everywhere.  I took my road bike that has a regular tube rear tire in 26mm (that is as large as will fit) and a front 650bx47mm tire run tubeless. In five weeks I had one problem with the front tire where I ran over a number of goat heads and just made it back to my room.  The next morning the rear tire (tube) was flat and when I put air in it, it deflated explosively.  I've been using a rear latex tube for months and the stem patch seam finally gave out.  Oh, well. The benefit of latex has nothing to do with weight.  At similar pressures they ride much smoother and roll faster.  But, they inevitably fail at the stem seam, at least for me.  Then I go back to a butyl tube until the harsher ride annoys me and I go back.  
The front went flat as well, but the benefit there of tubeless is that you put air in it and then ride off and wait for the centrifugal force to push sealant to the hole and then never worry again.  
Tubeless and latex deliver a similar smoother ride but with tubeless you can really drop the pressure without fear of pinch-flats.  
My home roads are nothing like Oceanside and half of them are dirt, so riding 650bx47-52mm tires is the only way to go.  
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chas
I agree.  For me the biggest benefit of tubless is not getting pinch flats (along with not getting the rare puncture).

I ran those Conti gatorskins and 4seasons for about a decade.  Punctures were extremely rare.  I did cheat and run them tubless and did find a wet spot once at end of life, indicating a puncture that has sealed.  

But I ride rough surfaces, don't ride at max PSI, and pinch flats were always a risk.  That has totally gone away with tubless.

Tubeless is a hassle in some ways - mostly in mounting - although some go on super easy.   The bike has to be ridden regularly (or at least have the tires rotated) to prevent the sealant from pooling and drying out.  Sealant has to be topped off every ~ 6 months.    
Realistically, flats are rare in the front tire, and pinching is (for me) fairly rare in 50mm + tires.  Since I like to swap out front tires, I just use a tube in that wheel.  But my 32mm road slicks are tubless - just mount and forget for 6 months.  
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Bullrun
I am 200 lbs, ride a Allied Able and love the GK 32 slick for California rough roads leading to fire roads and/or pavement roads only. Most is hard packed, and I run around 80 psi..I currently run them tubed. I usually change tires from 40's to these and run tubeless with the 40's.. 
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tvcrider

Cmtgravel wrote:
Sorry, i hope i didnt come off as criticizing. I admit.i'm a bit of.a curmudgeon when it comes to this issue, as i've never seen the need for going tubeless personaaly. I have a little experience with latex tubes, and i'm not a fan. Only suggested for the weight benefit. I suggested the Conti's for their durability and puncture protection. I know many will disagree with my views on this, I just wanted to present the other side of the argument. Given your stated intended use, the benefit of switching to tubeless, with all its added headaches, seems minimal.

No offense taken.  Thank you for your input!  I haven't yet ordered them, but It looks like I will be going with Conti's 5000 TL in 32mm and I will try them tubeless. 

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Conan
I have 32mm Continental GP5000 tubeless tires on my gravel bike and they are fantastic on road and root infested Greenways.  Great speed and confortable.
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TheRo0sTer
A rule of thumb... if it hurts or is too rough in gravel, your tire pressure is too high. If it's squirrely on the asphalt or hard packed gravel, your tire pressure is too low. We aren't all built the same, our bikes aren't carrying the same amount of weight. Tires all have a different feel as well. One set I can run 35psi and another set I can't get below 45 psi due to bump steer.
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