anthonyeric1357
I am currently running a compact crank and a 12-30 cassette.  I am finding that I may like to have another gear or two at times for climbs.  Is anyone running a mountain derailleur and 11-32 or 11-34 cassette on their setups?

Tony
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Mr. Dirt Bag
I run 44 x 11-36 on my cross/gravel bike.  I recently had to replace a SRAM Force rear shifter.  It was 4 yrs old.   I'm not sure if running such a large cassette on a road shifter had anything to do with it.

Mr. Dirt Bag

btw 
The Dirt Bag Dash website has been updated.
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GRAVELBIKE
Campy, Shimano, or SRAM?
GRAVELBIKE.com - ride everything
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anthonyeric1357
Shimano.  Will a long cage road derailleur get me up to a 32 on the cassette, or will I need to get a mountain derailleur?
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DustyRhodes
If you are using 10 speed brifters, I am pretty sure Shimano SLX rear der will work.  I think I know a local guy running that setup and the Shimano build for Black Mountain Cycles uses that combination
http://www.blackmtncycles.com/p/cross-build-kits_07.html

You could probably use an XT rear der but that gets a lot more confusing because of the different models.
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ayjaydee
anthonyeric1357@yahoo.com wrote:
Shimano.  Will a long cage road derailleur get me up to a 32 on the cassette, or will I need to get a mountain derailleur?


I used a shimano slx with a 6 gear 32 tooth freewheel on a road bike with friction shifters.
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GRAVELBIKE
Note that 10s Shimano ROAD shifters are NOT compatible with Shimano 10s MTB rear derailleurs. If you're using 10s ROAD shifters and need a super-long cage rear derailleur, you need a 9s model.
GRAVELBIKE.com - ride everything
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anthonyeric1357
So I need a 9sp derailleur to go with the 10sp road shifter?  why would it matter?  shouldn't the shifter move the derailleur to the right spacing, or is the cable to travel ration different?
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anthonyeric1357
I looked at the build in the link you posted, Gravebike.  What is the adjuster that is labeled with the rear derailleur?  I just tried a 9 sp xtr long cage that I have, it did not work.  Also, could I get away with a 32 chainring in place of my 34?
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GRAVELBIKE
I didn't post a link.

Shimano changed the cable-pull requirements when they introduced their 10s MTB components. A 9s MTB derailleur will work, and Volagi ships some of their bikes with that setup (34/50 and 11-36).

If you have a compact crank with a 110mm BCD, the smallest ring you can run is the 33t from Specialites T.A.
GRAVELBIKE.com - ride everything
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Seth
Shimano 105 long cage will run up to 32 (according to the instructions on the box it comes in).
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redline814
My current setup is 39/11-34. On hills I would prefer 1-2 gears...lower.

Since you have compact cranks, swap to a smaller chain ring and be done with it.
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max
On my cross/gravel bike, I run 105 10 speed shifters with a 50/34 up front with a 9-speed SLX rear derailleur and a SRAM 11-32 cassette. This is a really nice combination. I don't use the 32 tooth cog much but it's very nice to have when you need it.
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BluesDawg
50/34 crank and 12-32 cassette with SRAM Red WiFli mid cage rear derailleur on my Crux. Just enough range for the hills on the local gravel roads.
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anthonyeric1357
I finally got my set up dialed in.  I had an issue with my shifter and/or the cable/housing line.  I now have and old xtr long cage 9 sp on with an 11-36 cassette and 34-50 crank.  Just enough for the hard climbs, even in longer rides.  I needed the granny gear for an 8% grade climb an hour and a half into a hard ride.  the setup is riding fast, as it is more like a hard gravel racing setup rather than gravel cruising.  Trek Domane with knobby 30 tires, light and fast.  The Domane frame sure does dull the bumps in the road though.
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Flydyl
Hi Folks,
Similar to others' concerns... I've got a 2016 Haanjo Comp with 46/36 chainrings (11-32 cogset).  That's a 386 EVO Gossamer Cross bb and crankset.  I really, really need a lot more climbing power.  Advice please:
* Can I change to smaller 110 bcd chainrings?  If so, how small and which brand(s)?  
* Could I run one of those massive cogs in the back, so that i'd have something like an 11-42?  With a Wolf Tooth Tanpan? 

Please advise: I really want more climbing gears! 
Thanks, everyone,
Flydyl
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DrSpoke
I'm not sure what the rest of your drivetrain is but will assume it's 11-sp Shimano.

1)  A 110 bcd crank (compact) should be able to fit a 34t chainring easily.  Manufacture likely won't make much difference.  These are inexpensive, at least relative to the large chainring, so is a no-brainer modification.  Note that 2t in front is about the same as 1t in the back.

2)  Myself and most of my buddies are running a SRAM 11-36 in the back.  All of us are using Shimano Ultegra long cage RD.  And no issues at all.  If you do run into pulley/cassette interference there is the Wolftooth RoadLink that will likely fix it.  If you need a larger cassette, then you are into either the SRAM XC 10-42 or the Shimano mountain cassettes.  These would likely require a new RD.  I like the idea of an XTR or XT RD w/clutch combined w/the Tanpan.
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bobknh
My $02: You get much more gear range by using wide range cassette's than messing with chain rings. It's just math. I live in very hilly south central NH. And while I'm a strong climber, my 73 year old knees have seen  a bit too much vertical ascent over the years. My current set up is a medium cage Shimano 11 speed rear derailleur with either an 11-36, or an 11-40 cassette. I also prefer a 2x 36/46 CX set up in front. To achieve this, I have a Wolftooth Roadlink on all of my bikes - both road and gravel. It works extremely well - for either 10 or 11 speed drive trains. Go to the Wolftooth website for the math; and for specific recommendations for your drive train. It's a $20 component that can make your rides mores enjoyable, and your knees last for awhile longer.
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shiggy
DrSpoke wrote:
I'm not sure what the rest of your drivetrain is but will assume it's 11-sp Shimano.

1)  A 110 bcd crank (compact) should be able to fit a 34t chainring easily.  Manufacture likely won't make much difference.  These are inexpensive, at least relative to the large chainring, so is a no-brainer modification.  Note that 2t in front is about the same as 1t in the back.

2)  Myself and most of my buddies are running a SRAM 11-36 in the back.  All of us are using Shimano Ultegra long cage RD.  And no issues at all.  If you do run into pulley/cassette interference there is the Wolftooth RoadLink that will likely fix it.  If you need a larger cassette, then you are into either the SRAM XC 10-42 or the Shimano mountain cassettes.  These would likely require a new RD.  I like the idea of an XTR or XT RD w/clutch combined w/the Tanpan.


36x32 = 30.4 gear inches
36x34 = 28.6
34x32 = 28.7
36x36 = 27.0
34x34 = 27.0
34x36 = 25.5
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bobknh
bobknh wrote:
My $02: You get much more gear range by using wide range cassette's than messing with chain rings. It's just math. I live in very hilly south central NH. And while I'm a strong climber, my 73 year old knees have seen  a bit too much vertical ascent over the years. My current set up is a medium cage Shimano 11 speed rear derailleur with either an 11-36, or an 11-40 cassette. I also prefer a 2x 36/46 CX set up in front. To achieve this, I have a Wolftooth Roadlink on all of my bikes - both road and gravel. It works extremely well - for either 10 or 11 speed drive trains. Go to the Wolftooth website for the math; and for specific recommendations for your drive train. It's a $20 component that can make your rides mores enjoyable, and your knees last for awhile longer.

I'd like to add one comment to my suggestions above --- I find that with my set up's I need to run a very long chain to allow the rear derailleur to reach the 36 or 40 cogs in the back. When I run the 36/11, there is just barely enough room between the lower section of chain and the rear derailleur pulley. It works, but I usually shift up to the 46 before I get there. In some situations, the 46/11 is not high enough. The ideal may be running a 48/34 in front; but the current Shimano 6800 asymmetric 4 bolt chainring design makes this hard and expensive to do. A very interesting, but expensive alternative is the White Industries VBC cranks, that now are finally available with modern integrated crank axles.
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shiggy
bobknh wrote:

I'd like to add one comment to my suggestions above --- I find that with my set up's I need to run a very long chain to allow the rear derailleur to reach the 36 or 40 cogs in the back. When I run the 36/11, there is just barely enough room between the lower section of chain and the rear derailleur pulley. It works, but I usually shift up to the 46 before I get there. In some situations, the 46/11 is not high enough. The ideal may be running a 48/34 in front; but the current Shimano 6800 asymmetric 4 bolt chainring design makes this hard and expensive to do. A very interesting, but expensive alternative is the White Industries VBC cranks, that now are finally available with modern integrated crank axles.


There is no good reason to every run the small/small (36x11) combo. Poor chainline, inefficient, and the ratio is available using the big ring.

My top gear is 44x11 with 650Bx38-42 tires. That is 30-31mph at a normal cadence, and I can spin it up to over 40mph on a downhill. To only time I need this gear on the flats is if I have a screaming tailwind. Otherwise, it is a descent and if is more efficient to tuck and coast at 32+mph.

The White Industries crank price is very reasonable once you figure in the ratio choices and ring replacement costs. I have more than 7000 miles on mine and the rings show only minor wear.
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EddNog
On my gravel bike, I experimented with a 1x10 conversion because I was constantly dissatisfied with my front shifting setup. I ended up falling in love with oval chainrings when I did the 1x10 conversion on my MTB, and decided to perform a 1x10 conversion on my gravel bike as well. Both bikes utilize SunRace 11-42 CS-MS3 cassettes, but I went with a 30T narrow-wide oval on my MTB and a 38T narrow-wide oval on my gravel bike.

The gravel bike (picture is a little outdated, because I just swapped over my old Force crank and shifters from the road bike I'm selling to this one to save some weight and add a little bling):


My new road bike, although not strictly a gravel bike, is also currently fairly gravel-friendly, at least until I swap the tires to the Schwalbe S-Ones I have waiting for my tubeless valves to come in. I'm actually using a 44T narrow-wide direct-mount oval in conjunction with a Shimano Deore XT 11-46 cassette:


-Ed
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Absoluteblack
Hi everyone,

Given that you're all nuts about gravel bike gearing, I thought I'd throw this in. Aside from our range of bolt on and direct mount 1x chainrings which it seems quite a few of you are already using, Absoluteblack is currently working on a range of 'super compact' rings for 110mm 4 bolt road cranks. It's looking like 48/32 will be first out the door. Giving that low grinder, but also something that will keep the KPH us when the gravel is hard and the road long. Not ready quite yet, but real soon.

Cheers,
AB 
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EddNog
Absoluteblack wrote:
Hi everyone,

Given that you're all nuts about gravel bike gearing, I thought I'd throw this in. Aside from our range of bolt on and direct mount 1x chainrings which it seems quite a few of you are already using, Absoluteblack is currently working on a range of 'super compact' rings for 110mm 4 bolt road cranks. It's looking like 48/32 will be first out the door. Giving that low grinder, but also something that will keep the KPH us when the gravel is hard and the road long. Not ready quite yet, but real soon.

Cheers,
AB 


Any other sizes besides 38 planned for 110x5 standard?

-Ed
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