bobknh Show full post »
Zurichman
bobknh wrote:

I'm glad I'm getting this education about the finer meaning of "tubeless ready" vs. "tubeless compatible". I guess "tubeless compatible" means that when your tire goes flat in the middle of nowhere one day, for no apparent reason, the tire wont roll off the rim; and you'll have one heck of a time removing it to put in a tube. But, you wont be able to sue the manufacturer. After all, the tire stayed on, and they never claimed that it would hold air without a tube.


lol but I guess not lol to the person this happens to out in the boonies with no rescue in sight aka no cell phone coverage.

Zman
If it was easy it wouldn't be a memory. You just hope you don't have all your memories in the same ride. been there dun that Zman
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justaute
That's why, for tubeless, one should consider carrying Dynaplug or Genuine Innovation tubeless-plug kit. [smile]
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SpeedyChix
My Bon Jon Ultra Lites weeped for quite awhile. After a couple months they finally settled down. Pulled off and switched to something else for this fall and when I remount them next spring will probably use tubes. Not sure they'll set up again.
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Zurichman
justaute wrote:
That's why, for tubeless, one should consider carrying Dynaplug or Genuine Innovation tubeless-plug kit. [smile]


Newbie here so no I haven't heard of either but you have my interest for sure. I guess it works just like a car tire plug kit. How much does either one weigh ?


Zman
If it was easy it wouldn't be a memory. You just hope you don't have all your memories in the same ride. been there dun that Zman
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justaute
Yes, sir. Instead of my explaining it, I'll share the below-linked thread. There are a couple of options for bike tubeless, and I have the micro. Both weighs very little -- maybe a couple of ounces?

https://www.velocipedesalon.com/forum/f2/tubeless-tires-you-need-dynaplug-48181.html

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Skldmark
http://teamdicky.blogspot.com/2017/06/plugged-in.html Rich Dillen-Bad Idea Racing plugs Dynaplug.
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JHand
These tires suck tubeless. Beware; don’t run these tubeless in a gravel race. I flatted out of the last two races I’ve done running these tires. In both extra light and standard casing. The last time, on the standard casing, I got two flats in one race and it cost me first place!! They don’t hold air for sh*t which will cause them lose air during a race, and then you run the risk of burping or rim strike. The side walls are way too thin for gravel. Twice I got sidewall punctures that required me to stop and put a tube in. Very aggravating. If you are into racing I would consider another tire. I wish Jan would refund me the $300 I have wrapped up in two sets of these tires, plus my race entry fees, for claiming they are tubeless compatible. They suck. The only thing positive I will say is that they do ride really nice on the road.

One other thing of note, I feel like the casings are very wobbly. Out of all the tires I’ve tried these tires have the most wobble in them when you spin your wheels. It’s not my rims which are perfectly true it’s just that the shape of the casing is less than perfect. And yes, the bead is set correctly.
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thegreatdelcamo
Have to so strongly disagree. I’ve nearly 10,000 miles on several sets. 3 flats. Two which healed themselves. And they run true as could be if properly mounted. 

Beware of hostile posts...
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JHand
Not a hostile post, just sharing my personal experience. They are mounted correctly thank you very much. I've been a wrench for years. The sidewalls are just extremely porous and even with the recommended Orange sealant, it takes a long time for them to set up to the point  where they aren't losing 10-12 pounds overnight. Never had this problem with any other tire and I've been running tubeless for years. In my view, the focus was on making the most supple tire (thinnest sidewall) possible, which they probably succeeded at, but sacrificed durability in the process. 

In comparision I have a set of Panaracer Gravelking Slicks (38mm), which I highly recommend, on another bike that has been hanging up for months while I toiled with the Compass tires and they are still holding air. They set up instantly, too. Pretty much the same tire with a more durable "rubberized" sidewall. 

Cheers
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JHand
SpeedyChix wrote:
My Bon Jon Ultra Lites weeped for quite awhile. After a couple months they finally settled down. Pulled off and switched to something else for this fall and when I remount them next spring will probably use tubes. Not sure they'll set up again.
See my post above. Neither of mine will hold air. Frankly, if you ride fast and hard, it's dangerous.
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thegreatdelcamo
I agree they can weep for a while. Maybe a third of mine have. I add a little more sealant, slosh it all around. Presto. No more leakage. 

I’ve mounted probably 10 sets of various Compass tires on Enve (4.5 AR Disks, G 23, G 27), Reynolds ATR, and Stans Avion wheels. All but one have been extra light.

Every one has snapped into place (albeit a couple needed a compressor) without a wobble.

Maybe I’ve just been incredibly lucky... obviously I use top-quality wheels,
if that matters. Maybe my roads lack the type of rocks that tend to cut. Maybe I ride differently (more lightly and carefully). I know some guys around here have gone to thicker sidewall tires due to a couple flats.

And yet I do ride them hard and race them successfully, very often at speeds in excess of 25-28 mph on pothole strewn roads. I frankly attribute some of my success to these tires.

While there is no doubt the sidewalls are gossamer thin, and can cut on jagged rocks (and how often this happens will be a function of your rocks and probably air pressure—I weigh 162 and run 27 psi front and 30-31 rear), there is equally no question that, at low pressures, they are the best tires on earth for going fast on a gravel bike. Everything else with thick sidewalks will consume watts at the low pressures needed to go the fastest.

Then, happily, I pump them to 40-45 and train with the road racing club. It may look odd in a rotation and then breaking into a sprint on my Diverge—with a bunch of guys on road bikes with skinny tires—but IF these tires slow me down, it isn’t by much.
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