DKeane
First, thanks to the moderators for approving my account.

I have one set of wheels, so with all the swapping of tires (depending upon gravel, road, etc....) I generally use tubes.  Saw some recent reviews on Tubolitos and they were generally pretty positive, other than the occasional bad one out of the box (leaking at the stem tube interface).

Anyone have significant experience with them?  Thanks
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Heffe
I’ve been using a set for about 6 months with no flats whatsoever. They also seem to hold air a bit better than I’m used to with standard tubes. I ride on almost a daily basis. The first one I got did have the aforementioned leak, however. Tubolito sent me a replacement. 
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DKeane
Heffe wrote:
I’ve been using a set for about 6 months with no flats whatsoever. They also seem to hold air a bit better than I’m used to with standard tubes. I ride on almost a daily basis. The first one I got did have the aforementioned leak, however. Tubolito sent me a replacement. 


Excellent, thank you for your feedback. 
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Skldmark
My experience with latex and panaracer green-lite urethane is that when they do fail/“pop” they will split or shred more often than butyl tubes. As this means they are not patchable, have a good backup plan.
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Heffe
I don’t think that Tubolito use latex or urethane. They have their own patch kits, cost a few dollars.
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DKeane
Heffe wrote:
I don’t think that Tubolito use latex or urethane. They have their own patch kits, cost a few dollars.


Agree - it is a different composition entirely.
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Volsung
I have some Foss tubes that are similar that I use with my non tubeless winter tires.  I'm not positive but I *feel* like they act weird in the cold and get hard and sluggish, more so than butyl tubes.  

I've never tried them in the summer so it may not be an issue then.

Also I live in Minneapolis so my cold might be different than yours.
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Shaun McNally
I've been using the tubilito gravel/cx tubes on my checkpoint since September. Probably got about 500 miles on them now, all gravel. I love them. I also ran regular tubes in my tires and the difference in weight was instantly noticeable. No flats, and I think they hold air better. In late Nov. early December we had a stretch of bad weather where I switched to my fat bike and didn't touch my gravel bike for almost a month.......the tire pressure was just 3 psi lower than when I left it, and sitting in my cold garage even.
I'm also in MN and haven't noticed anything different about them in the cold, granted I've only ridden them down to 20 degrees F. 
I did buy the special patch kit that they recommend, but haven't needed to use it yet.
I love how small they are rolled up, very nice for the spare in the saddle bag.
The one ding I have about them is the valve stem is very flexible. I make sure I'm careful when hooking and unhooking my pump.
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Skldmark
DKeane wrote:


Agree - it is a different composition entirely.
The thought was, since they aren’t buty, they may have their own idiosyncrasies.
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bnystrom
DKeane wrote:
I have one set of wheels, so with all the swapping of tires (depending upon gravel, road, etc....) I generally use tubes.

You should read their FAQ, as one thing they mention is that they're only swappable between wheels/tires with the same diameter and the same width, which could be an issue for your application. My guess is that being plastic, they mold to the shape of the rim/tire combination they're installed in and don't return to their original shape the way rubber tubes do. Assuming that's the case, it means that once you use them in a 40mm gravel tire, you're not going to be able to stuff them into a 25-30mm road tire.That means you'll need at least two sets of them, which pushes their already exorbitant cost into the $140-$150 dollar range. At that point, I'd stick with rubber tubes and start saving for a second set of wheels that I could run tubeless.

Perhaps they would work if you restrict yourself to relatively narrow 32-33mm 'cross tires off-road and relatively fat 30-32mm road tires, but assuming that you already have tires, that just adds more to the cost, pushing it into the $200 - $300+ range. It's also unclear how well they handle repeated changes.

Frankly, a second set of wheels looks like a much better solution for you and it's also a lot more convenient. Although I literally changed thousands of tires when I was in the bike biz and I can do it quickly, I wouldn't want to do it on a regular basis, every time I want to do a different type of ride. Additionally, multiple changes can be hard on the tire beads, particularly for tight-fitting tires.

Note also that sealant doesn't work with Tubolitos, which means that if you live in an area where thorns are an issue, you're likely to end up doing a fair amount of patching. They may be more puncture resistant, but they're not puncture proof.
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DKeane
That is really interesting.  Thanks for the information.
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