Afolpe
Have been running tubeless on my gravel and road bikes for a couple of years, at least. I'm starting to feel like the hassle of seating the tires, refreshing the sealant, cleaning them out, keeping the valve stems clean etc is outweighing the benefits. I run 40 psi whether I have tubes in or not, and honestly I can't remember getting more than the very occasional flat with tubes on gravel. Have had a couple of flats with tubeless lately that  wouldn't seal (Orange Seal, plenty in there I thought...), necessitating removal of tubeless valve, insertion of spare tube, etc. Would have been a lot faster just to whack in a new tube, or even to patch a hole. 
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BubbaS
You are the only one! LOL.

BS😁
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AlanEsh
I keep my bikes in a cool basement and in two years have not needed to clean out any tires, the sealant (Stan's) has remained fluid with very little booger-ing. I've had a couple of punctures that have sealed and I've not even known they occurred until I was home cleaning my bike.
On the other hand, the last two tubes I tried to change had defects (fuck Kenda tubes!) and were it not for the kindness of strangers would have left my wife without transportation in the Black Hills.
I'll keep my tubeless tires 🙂
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jerock
I'd never go back.  I had 3 flats on one training ride in the Flint Hills on tubed tires.  Knock on wood I've not had a flat since going tubeless in over 3 years.
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Afolpe
Yeah, maybe I'm just having a run of bad luck. Or I'm still not completely sure what I'm doing tubeless. Old dogs and new tricks...

This may be a stupid question, but tell me how I should have handled this:

I got a huge nail through my back tire. Tire went flat right away. Nail was embedded in the tire. I removed it, and then just assumed that since it was totally flat, I had to put a tube in. There was a decent amount of Orange Seal in there, though. I didn't have tire worms with me (I haven't gone there yet). 

Should I have just tried to reinflate the tire, perhaps with the puncture down so the sealant collected there? I feel like I just relapsed instantly into "flat tube, replace" mode.

thx!
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jerock
You need to carry a plug kit for things like nails.  That's part of the deal.  With what you had probably the tube was the only option.
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Kwontumspeed
What jerock said. You're missing a plug kit in your bag.

I use Dynaplug and have successfully sealed >0.25" punctures albeit using two plugs caused by large nail or similar. At best will keep you riding, and worst get you home. I also tend to carry a small vile of extra sealant for something that large, too, as you may expend all of it trying to seal (note, diluting with water as last resort will work, too).
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Afolpe
Ok. Any particular plug kits you all like?
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jerock
It's a little pricey, but I also carry the Dynaplug kit.  It's light weight & small.
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Afolpe
Which Dynaplug ?
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jerock
I have the Dynaplug Micro Pro.
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jerock
I know many that just buy the cheap plugs from any auto supply & make their own kits.
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Afolpe
i just ordered the "racer". appreciate all of your advice.
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jerock
Good Luck!
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chas
I feel your pain. 

my primary ride has tubeless.  Sometimes I have put tubes in, but as soon as I get a flat, I go back to tubeless.  Got a flat in my tube about a mile into a ride and couldn't figure out how.  Maybe I ride more aggressively than average, but  I did get pretty tired of getting pinch flats.

Frustrating to put a kenda tube on, and have it go bad right away.  I had a batch of them that just blew out about 1/2 inch from the valve.  WTF?

I changed a tire on my tandem this weekend, and was shocked, over joyed, and reminded how darned simple and easy it is to change a non tubeless tire on a non tubeless wheel.   Tubeless is just so darn hit and miss on the ease/difficulty on installing.
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clarksonxc
I have too many bikes in the fleet to have everything tubeless.  Right now my strategy is to keep both 29ers set up tubeless, and only get the gravel bikes set up before big races.  The closest gravel we have is about a 1hr one way drive, so doing other road and limited gravel riding on tubes doesn't cause me too many problems.  When we travel to the bigger Midwest races; there's no question that tubeless is the only way to go.
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HollyBoni

My experience has been positive. 
I have an air compressor, seating tyres is a breeze. While this might sound bullsh*t to some people, i'm using the same Stans sealant that i've bought 2 years ago. I've actually re-used some of it in when I switched tyres. A minimal amount dried up in the tyres, the rest of it is still perfect. I don't clean out the valve cores. While they clog up just a bit, I can still pump up the tyres and get an accurate pressure reading. 

I haven't had a puncture in 2 years. When I changed tyres I noticed 2-3 holes in my tyres which I didn't even know about until then. I bottomed out the front tyre plenty of times where i'm sure tubeless saved the day. Keep in mind, i'm not as hardcore as some of the guys here who might ride hundreds of miles every week. 

Personally i'm not sure if i'll ever go back to tubes since luckily I haven't had to deal with the hassle side of tubeless (yet). 

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GOOG
Yes 🙂
I’m running Pro-One tubeless 28’s on my checkpoint now for commuting and roadie buddy fun, still no problems. The ride difference is night and day. I’ve reused sealant as well, it’s a bit messy but I’m frugal. Tire plug FTW. My real problem is remembering to swap a 35-40c tube in my bag after going back to gravel tires! 
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mosinglespeeder
I too have used tubeless in past but went back as I needed to put tubes in after the perpetual flat...thus I just went back for a while.  they are easy and the standby anyway.  But I did grab some Panaracer GKs 4omm for tubeless and will try them instead of what I tried in past. 

Hope it works out
the tire boot is a great thing to know
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nikkiss
yeah go back! me I stop using tubeless the last 1 year
hi
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Afolpe
Update: Put in a tube, rode it once for 30 miles on gravel. Woke up the next day, tire was flat. Reinstalled the tubeless setup.
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HollyBoni
Afolpe wrote:
Update: Put in a tube, rode it once for 30 miles on gravel. Woke up the next day, tire was flat. Reinstalled the tubeless setup.


That's because you've upset the tubeless gods with this thread. How dare you say you're fed up with tubeless? Now you'll have to be baptized again in a river of sealant. 
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hbs
I’ve never gone tubeless and I have no plans to. In 6000 miles on my gravel bike I’ve had two flats, both my fault, and I doubt if tubeless would have prevented them. 
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Cmtgravel
Tubes rock, tubeless sucks! IMHO, going tubeless is trying to solve a problem thats not a big issue by adding a bunch more issues. 
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jerock
All I can say is in the Flint Hills of Kansas tubeless has been the best thing that has happened to gravel riding.  I averaged at least 3 to 4 flats a year with tubes and certainly nothing I could have done to prevent them.  No flats since switching.  Everyone can have a different condition they ride in & may have different experiences.  I find tubeless pretty effortless when you get the system down.  Add an once of sealant every 3 months.  Have a compressor to set the tire when installing new tires.
Most I know that were set against tubeless have since switched.
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