bobknh
Has anyone tried the Airshot tubeless tire inflator: https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B01BJ4MXQY/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pC_S_ttl?_encoding=UTF8&colid=31LXAC01R3GMQ&coliid=I32JI7LNMK46CE&psc=1 ?
How well does it work for seating tubless tires? I have a compressor; but need something when I travel.
It's a bit pricey at around $100; but less expensive and more portable than integrated pump systems like the Topeak JoeBlow Booster. Of course I assume that you already have a decent floor pump to pressurize the Airshot. I love the screw on pump head on my Lezyne floor pump -- no bent valve stems. I find the the so called smarthead an abomination. I've also seen some hacks using plastic soda bottles, but putting 120-160 PSI into a plastic bottles really scares me.
Quote 0 0
knl2stl
I saw a Specialized one a while back in a shop.  No idea how it works, but about half the price.  

https://www.specialized.com/us/en/accessories/17pumpfloorair-tool-blast-117288/117288
Quote 0 0
bobknh
knl2stl wrote:
I saw a Specialized one a while back in a shop.  No idea how it works, but about half the price.  

https://www.specialized.com/us/en/accessories/17pumpfloorair-tool-blast-117288/117288
From the pictures, the specialized product seems to work the same way. There is a presta valve on top that you atttach your floor pump. And a hose and chuck that you attach to your tires valve. That lever on top probably release the pressure into your tire. Looks like a much more reasonable price. Thanks.
BTW - How do you put live links into a posting on this forum. I've been copying the URL from my search bar, but the system doesn't create a live link for me.
Quote 0 0
jchap
The Topeak is a single unit, and the others require you carry your pump too.  It you don't care about that, I think it would come down to volume.  I couldn't find the volume for the specialized. Volume is also a double edged sward since more volume stands a better chance of seating a larger tire, but take longer to fill.
Quote 0 0
bobknh
Thanks everyone for the feedback and suggestions. I've looked at several products and here are the pros and cons I see.
Integrated floor pumps:
Topeak JoeBlow:
Pros - Tested by JOM at Gravel Cyclist with very positive review
       - Can be switched easily to a regular floor pump to either complete the inflation or    be used as a regular floor pump.
       - easy to use bleeder valve to adjust tire pressure
       - large, easy to read, gauge.
Cons- Cost --$160
         Size - Bulky. But that means it is sturdy.
         Other- Smarthead. I don't like this design. Too easy to bend valves.
Bontrager :
Pros - less expensive $120
        - tested  by bike radar - works and is sturdy
Cons - flimsy control handle
        - Gauge hard to read and poorly graded
        - No bleeder valve
        - Smart head

Independent Canisters: 
Airshot:
 Pros: Well designed and compact.
        - Inflation chuck can either be screwed into tire valve or used as a regular chuck.               Could help with seating difficult tires. 
Cons: Cost -$100.
Specialized Air Tool:
Pros: Cost -- $55
Cons: No test info. available. But it probably works as well as others.

If cost was no object; and if I didn't already have a collection of floor pumps, I would probably go for the Topeak as a great do everything pump. But, since I prefer using my Lezyne's and don't like "Smartheads" I'm more likely to chose the Specialized Air Tool. Of course, if anyone has more experience, I'd appreciate suggestions and advice.
       
Quote 0 0
knl2stl
bobknh wrote:

From the pictures, the specialized product seems to work the same way. There is a presta valve on top that you atttach your floor pump. And a hose and chuck that you attach to your tires valve. That lever on top probably release the pressure into your tire. Looks like a much more reasonable price. Thanks.
BTW - How do you put live links into a posting on this forum. I've been copying the URL from my search bar, but the system doesn't create a live link for me.


...I meant how well it works.  I could only find a short video with no review.  Just seems like a better deal considering the price.  

For the live link, I just copied from the bar and pasted.  Just worked I guess.
Quote 0 0
xhx
I have an Airshot. Works flawlessly. I went that way since I already have a good pump. Basically this thing's an easily packable air compressor.
Quote 0 0
bobknh
xhx wrote:
I have an Airshot. Works flawlessly. I went that way since I already have a good pump. Basically this thing's an easily packable air compressor.

Thanks for the feedback. Hope that someone who has tried the Specialized device can also confirm it's effectiveness. At $55, the Specialized version may be a "best buy".
Quote 0 0
cjdaking
I have the Bontrager. Works well with mountain and cross/gravel tires, but has not performed so well with road tubeless tires so far. I had to use a CO2 to seat the bead on my road wheels.
Quote 0 0
imajez

bobknh wrote:
Airshot:
 Pros: Well designed and compact.
        - Inflation chuck can either be screwed into tire valve or used as a regular chuck.               Could help with seating difficult tires. 
Cons: Cost -$100.
Specialized Air Tool:
Pros: Cost -- $55
Cons: No test info. available. But it probably works as well as others.
       
I'm sure the Airshot will drop in dollar price along with the plummeting pound. They are already closer in price here in UK £40 Vs £50.

Not seen any reviews of the Specialized version either, but the Airshot seems to always be rated very highly indeed.

Quote 0 0
bobknh
After thinking over the alternatives and prices, I went for the Airshot. Like others have commented, I already own several excellent floor pumps and a compressor. The integrated pump solution didn't appeal to me. The Airshot looked like a a solid well made product; and I could buy it Amazon and easily return it if didn't like it. I've already seated several tubeless GG tires with the Airshot without a single failure. It works very well, is very sturdy and compact for travel, but you do have to remove the valve core from your tubeless valve stem in order to use the special Airshot inflation head which inserts directly into the valve body. There is a small rubber gasket which holds the Airshot inflation head in place. This may wear eventually. I hope that replacements will be available. But, given the simplicity of the design, I'm sure that I could put together a DIY head replacement. Finally, even though I already own a compressor, I find that the Airshot is so easy to set up and use, that I even use the Airshot in preference to my compressor. The Specialized version may be just as good; but once you throw in the shipping cost ($12 from Specialized, Free shipping on Amazon), there wasn't a big enough difference in price to justify trying it. Of course, if you have a nearby Specialized dealer, you may be able to try the Specialized device in the store, and also save the shipping cost.

Quote 0 0